Infant/Toddler Relationships, Interactions and Guidance

Part 2: Guidance

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The second webinar in the series provides early childhood educators an opportunity to explore the topics of socialization and guidance. The webinar highlights the connection between the early childhood educator competencies for relationships, interactions, and guidance. It provides examples, ideas, and resources for how to provide effective guidance for social behavior in the infant/toddler group care setting. In addition, it addresses the important roles of family members, teachers, and program leadership, in helping infants and toddlers learn about and develop strategies for social interactions, relationships, and managing conflict.

Archived Webinar
Recorded on May 27, 2015

PowerPoint Presentation (PDF)

Presenter: Deborah Greenwald

Presenter Deborah Greenwald

Deborah Greenwald joined WestEd's Center for Child and Family Studies in 2002 as a Senior Program Associate. She directed the development of California's Infant/Toddler Learning and Development Program Guidelines and is a faculty member of the Program for Infant/Toddler Care trainer institutes. Greenwald has been involved in developing training materials and revising PITC documents. She is currently part of a development team, which is creating an online degree for infant toddler teachers for the Office of Head Start.

Prior to working at WestEd, Greenwald spent 15 years in infant/toddler group care. She also taught parent/infant guidance classes and was an infant/toddler trainer in a resource and referral agency.

Greenwald received a BA in child development from Humboldt State University and an MA in human development from Pacific Oaks College. She also holds certificates from the American Montessori Society and Resources for Infant Educarers.

This series highlights the California Early Childhood Educator (ECE) Competencies (http://www.cde.ca.gov/sp/cd/re/ececomps.asp) which describe the knowledge, skills and dispositions that early childhood educators need in order to provide high quality care and education to young children and their families.

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